Gov. John Hickenlooper issues health warning on marijuana cultivated by Colorado Wellness Centers

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper issued an executive order along with a health and safety advisory Wednesday warning people not to use marijuana cultivated by Colorado Wellness Centers because the company used unapproved pesticides.

The company, which also does business as Lush, allegedly used off-label pesticides called pyriproxyfen while cultivating marijuana, according to the Wednesday afternoon bulletin, according to a joint advisory by the Colorado Department of Agriculture and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Affected products include marijuana flower, trim, concentrates, and infused products, the advisory says.

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.


Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper [cq comment="cq"]issued an executive order along with a health and safety advisory Wednesday warning people not to use marijuana cultivated by Colorado Wellness Centers [cq comment="cq"]because the company used unapproved pesticides.
The post Gov. John Hickenlooper issues health warning on marijuana cultivated by Colorado Wellness Centers appeared first on The Cannabist. […]

First recreational marijuana dispensary opens in Longmont city limits

Legal recreational pot sales within Longmont city limits began Monday morning with Black Hawk resident Tyler Worley’s purchase of 28 pre-rolled joints from Boulder-based Terrapin Care Station at its new store at 650 20th Ave.

“That’s pretty cool,” Worley said about being the first person to legally purchase recreational cannabis from a retailer within the city limits.

A group of nearly 50 people, including Longmont elected officials, city staff and nonprofit leaders, celebrated the opening of Terrapin as the city’s first recreational marijuana dispensary.

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.


Legal recreational pot sales within Longmont city limits began Monday morning with Black Hawk resident Tyler Worley’s purchase of 28 pre-rolled joints from Boulder-based Terrapin Care Station at its new store at 650 20th Ave.
The post First recreational marijuana dispensary opens in Longmont city limits appeared first on The Cannabist. […]

Man sentenced to 3 years in prison for illegal marijuana operation in San Isabel National Forest

A federal judge sentenced a 25-year-old man last week to three years in federal prison for growing and intending to sell large quantities of marijuana, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced Tuesday.

Margarito Yepez-Sanchez, a Mexican living in the United States illegally, also received three years of supervised release for conspiracy to manufacture and possess with intent to distribute 100 or more marijuana plants.

Yepes-Sanchez was first charged in September 2017, after federal agents discovered an illegal marijuana grow in San Isabel National Forest, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said. Agents found approximately 13,800 marijuana plants and at least 120 pounds of processed marijuana on 12 acres of federal land.

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.


Agents found approximately 13,800 marijuana plants and at least 120 pounds of processed marijuana on 12 acres of federal land.
The post Man sentenced to 3 years in prison for illegal marijuana operation in San Isabel National Forest appeared first on The Cannabist. […]

Rise of the terpenes: The next wave of weed innovation focuses on a little-known compound

Terpenes are aromatic compounds that impact marijuana's flavor and smell, but can also have biological effects.
Terpenes are aromatic compounds that impact marijuana’s flavor and smell, but can also have biological effects.
Image: Vicky Leta
This post is part of our High-tech High series, which explores weed innovations, and our cultural relationship with cannabis, as legalization in several U.S. states, Canada, and Uruguay moves the market further out of the shadows.


Chicken and waffles. Moscow Mule. Gingerbread cookies. Plum.

Joe Edwards says he’s made cannabis flower taste like all of the above and then some, using a high-tech curing unit produced by Colorado startup Yofumo.

The plum was made specially for his grandma who uses cannabis for her arthritis pain but hates the taste.

“My grandmother has no interest in Skunk No. 1,” Edwards, vice president of client applications and deployment at Yofumo, jokes, referring to a popular cannabis strain that smells, well, skunky.

Yofumo is part of a growing contingent of companies using science and tech to experiment with cannabis terpenes. Terpenes are aromatic organic compounds found naturally in marijuana, and they impact weed’s flavor and smell. The type and amount can also have varying biological effects when paired with THC and CBD, according to marijuana researchers.

“My grandmother has no interest in Skunk No. 1.”

As terpene experimentation advances, more producers are adding the amount and type of terpenes in their offerings to product descriptions. The compound, lesser-known among the general public, is something consumers are becoming more aware of as they seek out a specific kind of high — or flavor.

“We’re seeing a lot of our patients, or our clients, are demanding to be able to see terpene expression data for the flower that they purchase,” says Philippe Henry, director of R&D genetics and analytics at Flowr, which operates cultivation facilities in Canada.

“It’s part of educating people that they can make better choices,” adds Henry, who has a Ph.D. in population genetics and has analyzed 5,000 cannabis plants to study terpenes and genetic markers.

Cannabis gets a trim at a Flowr facility.
Cannabis gets a trim at a Flowr facility.

Image: Flowr

Sometimes marketing gets in the way of information in the cannabis field. Blue Dream is a popular strain, but some producers may call their plant Blue Dream even if it isn’t the same as the original product, Henry says. Knowing more about the flower’s chemical expression, and how you react to that mix, helps you as a consumer.

While there are hundreds of terpenes, a few show up more frequently. Generally linalool, also found in lavender, calms you, while limonene, with its citrusy aroma, can give you energy. Keep in mind, compounds may impact people differently. For example, myrcene generally relaxes, but it could do so to a different degree depending on the individual. When it comes to terpenes, and cannabis in general, it’s often about finding what works for you.

“I like to refer to it as the Jurassic Park principle.”

“It’s synergism,” says Mark Lewis, founder and president of NaPro Research in California. He compares a single terpene or a single cannabinoid, be that THC or CDB, to a note — but when everything works together, it’s a chord.

What Lewis compares to a musical chord, others have called the “entourage effect.” Researchers have analyzed how terpenes interact with other compounds, but there’s room for further investigation. Weed is complicated, and there’s more to discover with expanding legalization.

While terpene levels in cannabis flower tend to be below 2 percent and cannabinoids hover around 20 percent, NaPro tweaks that through breeding plants with desired attributes together over several years. They’ve amped the terpene level up to 7 percent and THC down to 9 percent in one plant for a client entering a competition that awards top quality cannabis. Changing a plant’s composition can take years of breeding. Think about how watermelon today looks and tastes different than it did thousands of years ago, due to human intervention.

Once you get below 1.5 percent, the THC takes over, Lewis, who has a Ph.D. in biochemistry, says. But if a single terpene is higher than 2 percent, the flavor and impact “will hit you like a ton of bricks.” One NaPro offering that has 4.5 percent myrcene will cause one’s eyes to feel heavy for 15 minutes or so and then provide balanced, euphoric pain relief, Lewis claims.

NaPro Research has also built a search tool for clients to review the chemical expression of marijuana products to discern quality and value.

A breakdown of Cookie Crizzle from NaPro's search tool, called PhytoFacts.
A breakdown of Cookie Crizzle from NaPro’s search tool, called PhytoFacts.

Image: NaPro Research

Flowr and NaPro mess around with a plant’s terpene profile through breeding, but Yofumo uses a different technique.

Its curing unit is currently only available commercially (the company is working on a consumer model). It releases terpenes from other plants stored in rods into a mahogany chamber, and through atmospheric transfer, the terpenes bind to the plant at a molecular level.

There’s a trend in the marijuana space of upping THC content to get super high, but Edwards says cultivators should look beyond THC.

“Instead of just maximizing THC potential, how can we also look at post-harvest curation practices and maximize terpene potential as well?” he questions.

OK, but how did he do that for his flower with hints of chicken and waffles?

Yofumo plans to release smaller units for consumers next year. As of know they focus on commercial clients.
Yofumo plans to release smaller units for consumers next year. As of know they focus on commercial clients.

Image: Yofumo

He starts with scrutinizing what makes up the flavor of chicken and waffles — the herbs you use, the buttery crunch of the bready exterior, the syrupy sweetness — and then replicates that as best as he can through chemical means.

“Once you understand the creation and how this works, it really does open itself up to you,” Edwards says. “I like to refer to it as the Jurassic Park principle.”

Edwards has had his share of duds in the past, but those failures have helped fine-tune the curing process.

“I’ve personally consumed an amount of cannabis that is extraordinarily unpleasant,” Edwards says. “I’ve had results that are similar to orange dish detergent just as often as I’ve had them be similar to orange fruit.”

Yofumo customers work with flower as well as oil, but it’s the expanding vape and oil market that has added an extra boost to terpene’s rise. (The strength of terpene’s impact in flower versus oil can differ because of a variety of factors, including the types of terpenes used, their source — cannabis or another botanical, synthetic or natural — and the ratio of cannabinoids to terpenes.)

Yofumo sells terpene formulas to clients to use in their curing units.
Yofumo sells terpene formulas to clients to use in their curing units.

Image: Yofumo

LucidMood adds terpenes from other botanicals to enhance cannabis oil for its vapes.

The Colorado company removes the jargon from the equation, naming vape pens based on the desired effect, including Energy, Calm, and Relief. Each contains roughly 40 percent THC, 40 percent CBD, and 20 percent terpenes. LucidMood is focused on new users, not the seasoned dabber. “It’s for the person who doesn’t have a Ph.D. in cannabis,” Tristan Watkins, LucidMood’s chief science officer, quips.

“The more that we learn about these, the more we can control.”

Calm includes geraniol, a terpene that smells like roses. LucidMood names its pens based on focus group studies in which the first group gets pens with terpenes and a second does not. By having a control group, LucidMood can show that terpenes were behind certain biological effects felt by the first group.

“The more that we learn about these, the more we can control,” Watkins, who has a Ph.D. in neurology, says.

There is a divide among terpene researchers, though. Purists believe terpenes should come from the cannabis plant, not an additive. There are also those who don’t want their marijuana’s flavor messed with at all.

“Consumers should be asking for a product that’s 100-percent cannabis,” Flowr’s Henry says. “The ones that are really 100-percent cannabis are going to catch a premium sliver of the market.”

LucidMood's "lifestyle" collection of pens include Chill and Energy.
LucidMood’s “lifestyle” collection of pens include Chill and Energy.

Image: LucidMood

As marijuana legalization spreads in the U.S., each state has its own regulations, from who can buy to requiring mold checks. At least two U.S. states, Nevada and New Mexico, mandate terpene testing.

Now, what about weed you eat? If terpenes bring flavor and aroma, are they being used in edibles? Not so much. Edibles tend to use distillates, a form of THC that is supposed to be void of taste, or cannabutter, which is butter infused with cannabis that provides a strong, euphoric high.

Periodic Edibles uses terpenes in their caramels, but for the effect, not the taste.

“We’re actually limited on how high we can go with the dosage because of the flavor that they add,” says the Oregon company’s founder, Wayne Schwind. If Schwind adds limonene to give a burst of energy, he doesn’t want the lemon flavor to overwhelm the caramel.

Periodic Edibles current packaging that lists terpenes.
Periodic Edibles current packaging that lists terpenes.

Image: Periodic Edibles

Periodic Edibles caramels will get a packaging makeover in 2019, but the terpene content will still be listed.
Periodic Edibles caramels will get a packaging makeover in 2019, but the terpene content will still be listed.

Image: Periodic Edibles

Periodic Edibles started listing terpene profiles on their packaging a few months ago. Schwind says budtenders, the people who sell weed at dispensaries, love it, but buyers are sometimes confused. Many don’t know what terpenes are, but that may change over time.

Multiple brewing companies have also been adding cannabis-derived terpenes to their beer. Devour Brewing Co. in Florida uses cannabis terpenes to add lemon, pine, and earthy flavors to its Florida Thunder IPA, and Lagunitas, a California brand owned by Heineken, adds them to its SuperCritical Ale. Prank, a Los Angeles bar, mixes terpenes in cocktails.

The terpene innovators may disagree on what’s best, but they concur that discerning customers will be key. Those seeking high-quality products, the craft beer drinkers of weed, if you will, are the target market for terpene experimentation.

“It’s not a big thing now, but I think that return to quality is going to explode,” says Yofumo founder Alfonso Campalans. “It’s really the only way the small and middle producer is going to compete.”

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Hemp taking off as viable product, and Colorado entrepreneurs are at the forefront of industry

Rianna Meyer doesn’t like talking about herself. When prompted, she ticks off a list of milestones: joining the Air Force, becoming a firefighting captain, finding her way to the Antarctic by way of Thailand. Her words tumble out with quick cadence, ready to talk about her latest adventure: hemp farming.

If she was a record, you would probably want to pick the needle up and play that first part over a few times. Yes, she lived in Antarctica and worked as a firefighter in one of the coldest places on Earth for five years.

Now, she is the vice president of operations for SanSal Wellness’ Veritas Farm in Pueblo. SanSal is an agribusiness wellness company that operates the Veritas Farm from their headquarters in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The farm grows and processes on-site hemp products that include medicinal oils, lip balm and gummies.

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.


Like with marijuana, Colorado entrepreneurs have been at the forefront of building up hemp as a viable undertaking.
The post Hemp taking off as viable product, and Colorado entrepreneurs are at the forefront of industry appeared first on The Cannabist. […]

Alt-rock icon Dean Ween pitches marijuana-friendly concert venue in downtown Denver

Dean Ween has big plans for Denver.

The guitarist, best known for his work in the iconic alt-rock band Ween, hopes to open a Denver concert venue where the audience will be allowed to use marijuana — without hiding from security.

The venue would be named Dean Ween’s Honeypot Lounge and would be located near Coors Field, according to chief operating officer Michael Polansky, who announced the plan at a city meeting on Monday.

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.


Dean Ween has big plans for Denver. The guitarist, best known for his work in the iconic alt-rock band Ween, hopes to open a Denver concert venue where the audience will be allowed to use marijuana — without hiding from security.
The post Alt-rock icon Dean Ween pitches marijuana-friendly concert venue in downtown Denver appeared first on The Cannabist. […]

Top Lawmakers In Two States Optimistic About Marijuana Legalization In 2019

The midterms are over, but Democrats in the House have already found themselves locked in another contentious race that could ultimately have big implications for marijuana legislation in the 116th Congress.

Will Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) reclaim her seat as speaker of the House? Or will a coalition of frustrated lawmakers usher in a new leader like Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-OH), who has all but confirmed her intent to run for the position?

What’s known at this point is that at least 17 Democratic lawmakers have signed a letter opposing Pelosi’s bid, and a handful of others have made public statements affirming that they plan to vote against Pelosi when the new Congress is seated on January 3.

Here’s a look at where Pelosi and Fudge fall on marijuana issues:

Looking at voting records, Pelosi cosponsored a number of marijuana bills in the 1990s and early 2000s–including several to protect states that legalized medical cannabis from federal interference–but she hasn’t signed her name onto a single piece of standalone marijuana legislation over the past 17 years.

Although Pelosi started cosponsoring fewer bills in general after being named House speaker in 2007 and in her post-speakership years, she’s still put her name on dozens of pieces of legislation during that time–though none are related to marijuana.

Fudge, meanwhile, has been ramping up her bill cosponsorships when it comes to cannabis reform. Over the past two years, the former chair of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) signed on to a bill that would end federal marijuana prohibition and a resolution acknowledging the failures of the war on drugs, for example. Prior to the current Congress, though, she hadn’t signed onto any cannabis bills since first joining the House in 2008.

Aside from the issue of proactive bill sponsorship, both Pelosi and Fudge have consistently voted in favor of floor amendments to protect legal medical and adult-use marijuana states, allow Department of Veterans Affairs doctors to recommend cannabis to patients, allow industrial hemp and expand access to banking institutions for marijuana businesses.

Both congresswomen have received “B” grades from NORML.

“Looking at the conversation of Democratic leadership right now and how the speaker vote is set to go, I would suspect that Pelosi is going to be elected to be the speaker for the 116th Congress,” NORML political director Justin Strekal told Marijuana Moment.

“Nancy Pelosi has demonstrated herself to be a very effective leader of the Democratic Caucus and was instrumental in ensuring a favorable vote outcome for the first time that the [Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA)] language was passed on the House floor in order to restrict the Department of Justice’s ability to enforce federal prohibition against the states that have legalized medical marijuana programs. Her operation has been engaged with–and in regular talks with–our champions of the Cannabis Caucus and members who are supportive, and we have every indication that we will have her full support in moving legislation forward that would end federal prohibition.”

Where the two Democratic lawmakers seem to diverge is in public statements about cannabis reform. For example, Pelosi has talked about marijuana (and yoga) as a safer alternative to opioids and she pushed back against former Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s decision to rescind an Obama-era marijuana guidance policy.

“Congress must now take action to ensure that state law is respected, and that Americans who legally use marijuana are not subject to federal prosecution,” she said in a press release earlier this year. “Democrats will continue to insist on bipartisan provisions in appropriations bills that protect Americans lawfully using medical marijuana. Congress should now consider expanding the provisions to cover those states that have decriminalized marijuana generally.”

Pelosi also endorsed California’s successful adult-use legalization ballot measure in 2016.

“Pelosi has been a solid ally on drug policy reform,” Michael Collins, interim director for the office of national affairs at the Drug Policy Alliance, told Marijuana Moment. “She has voted for many marijuana reform amendments, been a tough negotiator on numerous appropriations issues, has fought against regressive drug sentencing proposals like [Stop the Importation and Trafficking of Synthetic Analogues Act].”

“Crucially, her staff have always been available, willing and ready to advance drug policy reform,” he said.

Fudge, meanwhile, has been relatively quiet on the issue in spite of her recent support for reform legislation. And she doesn’t seem to have weighed in on Ohio’s unsuccessful 2015 legalization ballot measure.

For all of Pelosi’s talk and votes on cannabis reform, though, she was noncommittal when asked in September whether she planned to bring marijuana bills to the floor in 2019 if Democrats retook the House.

“Well, the marijuana initiatives have received bipartisan support on the floor of the House,” Pelosi said. “I don’t know where the president is on any of this. So any decision about how we go forward would have to reflect where we can get the result.”

Fudge also hasn’t indicated that she’d pursue a marijuana reform agenda if selected to be speaker. Instead, she told HuffPost reporter Matt Fuller that she’d make issues like health care, student debt, infrastructure and job creation top priorities for Democrats.

Other potential House speaker contenders on cannabis.

Another Ohio Democrat, Rep. Tim Ryan, is reported to be floating another run for the speakership after losing to Pelosi for Democratic leader in 2016. Ryan said that he was initially reluctant to get behind marijuana legalization but, after witnessing the harms of prohibition, he wrote that cannabis “should be legal in all 50 states.

The current chair of the CBC, Rep. Cedric Richmond (D-LA), is another potential contender for the position. Under Richmond’s leadership, the CBC has called for the end of federal marijuana prohibition and released a bill in May that outlined several wide-ranging reform proposals such as removing cannabis from the list of federally banned substances.

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) is reported to be laying the groundwork for a future House speaker run, starting with a bid to become the next House Democratic Caucus chair, Politico reports. He’s a strong proponent of marijuana decriminalization. “The connected and powerful–including many in high political office–have frequently admitted to smoking marijuana when they were young,” Jeffries wrote in a 2012 editorial for CNN. “We didn’t unmercifully penalize them. We should stop needlessly criminalizing tens of thousands of our young people for doing the same thing.”

Then, of course, there’s Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA), one of the most vocal advocates for cannabis reform on Capitol Hill for years. She’s also currently running to become the next House Democratic Caucus chair, though a sizable following of supporters are pushing her to compete against Pelosi in the speaker race. This year, Lee has introduced legislation to protect legal marijuana states and also promote diversity in the burgeoning cannabis industry.

Marijuana Won The Midterm Elections

Photo courtesy of Brian Shamblen.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.

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Edgewater’s $13 million civic center, partly funded by cannabis cash, opens Sunday

EDGEWATER — This weekend, thanks to its bustling marijuana trade, this tiny city on the western shore of Sloan’s Lake will forge a new civic identity with the opening of a $13 million municipal complex complete with library, police station, fitness center and city offices.

Without $3 million in tax money from the city’s half-dozen pot shops to put toward the project’s total cost, city manager HJ Stalf said, “We’d still be chasing it.”

And during that chase, Edgewater’s police force would still be working out of the cramped space of a former butcher’s shop and city staff would continue toiling out of an office furniture store-turned-city hall on Sheridan Boulevard.

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.


This weekend, thanks to its bustling marijuana trade, this tiny city on the western shore of Sloan’s Lake will forge a new civic identity with the opening of a $13 million municipal complex complete with library, police station, fitness center and city offices.
The post Edgewater’s $13 million civic center, partly funded by cannabis cash, opens Sunday appeared first on The Cannabist. […]

Man in Henderson marijuana dispute murder gets life sentence

A man who shot and killed another man in Henderson over a marijuana dispute has been sentenced to life in prison.

Christopher Toney, 39, was sentenced Friday in Adams County District Court for the 2017 shooting death of 34-year-old Christopher Stockwell, according to the district attorney’s office. The life sentence is without parole.

On Feb. 16, 2017, Commerce City officers responded to a 911 call on shots fired in the 9900 block of East 113th Avenue, according to a news release. Stockwell was found on a floor inside a home, he had been shot in the head.

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.


A man who shot and killed another man in Henderson over a marijuana dispute has been sentenced to life in prison.
The post Man in Henderson marijuana dispute murder gets life sentence appeared first on The Cannabist. […]

SF Council measures advocate gun control, legal pot

SANTA FE — Santa Fe Mayor Alan Webber and members of the City Council want to send a message to the state Legislature when it convenes in January for a 60-day session under a new governor: legalize weed and get a grip on gun reform.

Mayor Webber is introducing two resolutions that are scheduled to come before the City Council for approval on Nov. 14 that urges state lawmakers to take action on those issues during the 2019 legislative session.

Three of the eight city councilors — Joanne Vigil Coppler, Mike Harris and Peter Ives — have signed on as co-sponsors of the resolution that calls for the “legalization, decriminalization and/or regulation of cannabis and cannabis-related products for recreational use.”

The resolution notes that nine states and the District of Columbia have already legalized recreational cannabis, including Colorado, which has generated $817 million from taxes, licenses and fees from recreational sales since February 2014, much of it going to public schools.

The resolution also notes that the City Council in 2014 gave the city police the option issuing civil citations for possession of 1-ounce or less by ordinance, instead of filing criminal charges, and also declared pot possession “the lowest law enforcement priority.”

The mayor’s other resolution — co-sponsored by councilors Harris and Ives — urges the Legislature to adopt comprehensive “common sense” gun violence prevention laws, with cited examples including prohibiting domestic violence offenders under protective orders from purchasing a firearm, banning the sale of bumpstocks and holding parents or guardians of minors who gain access to firearms liable.

The resolution states that if the Legislature doesn’t have the “political will” to pass such laws, it should at least consider legislation to amend the state constitution to allow local governments to adopt their own gun measures in the interest of public safety.

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Marijuana is emerging among California’s vineyards, offering promise and concern

SANTA YNEZ VALLEY, Calif. — It is the fall harvest here in this fertile stretch of oaks and hills that produces some of the country’s best wine. This season, though, workers also are plucking the sticky, fragrant flowers of a new crop.

Marijuana is emerging among the vineyards, not as a rival to the valley’s grapes but as a high-value commodity that could help reinvigorate a fading agricultural tradition along the state’s Central Coast. Brushed by ocean breeze, cannabis has taken root, offering promise and prompting the age-old question of whether there can be too much of a good thing.

Cannabis has been fully legal in California for less than a year, and no place is generating more interest in it than the stretch of coast from Monterey to here in Santa Barbara County, where farmers now hold more marijuana cultivation licenses than in any other county.

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.


Marijuana is emerging among the vineyards, not as a rival to the valley’s grapes but as a high-value commodity that could help reinvigorate a fading agricultural tradition along the state’s Central Coast.
The post Marijuana is emerging among California’s vineyards, offering promise and concern appeared first on The Cannabist. […]

A cannabis Coke and a smile? Colorado companies hoping to tap infused beverage craze

When Coca-Cola publicly announces it is sizing up business opportunities in an industry, people take notice.

That was the case in mid September when Coke — the world’s largest beverage company with a market cap north of $211 billion — said it was keeping an eye on cannabis infused drinks, with a particular focus on beverages containing the non-psychoactive compound CBD. The announcement sent pot stocks soaring.

Coke may be on the sidelines for now, but at least one notable producer of bubbly beverages isn’t waiting around. Denver-based Molson Coors Brewing Co., one of the largest beer makers in the world, launched a joint venture this summer with a Canadian cannabis company with the aim to create alcohol-free, infused drinks.

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.


When Coca-Cola publicly announces it is sizing up business opportunities in a specific industry, people tend to take notice.That was the case with in mid September, when Coke — the world’s largest beverage company, said it was keeping an eye on cannabis infused drinks, with a particular focus on beverages containing the non-psychoactive compound CBD.
The post A cannabis Coke and a smile? Colorado companies hoping to tap infused beverage craze appeared first on The Cannabist. […]

This is a demo store for testing purposes — no orders shall be fulfilled. Dismiss